Government

Government2

Government

The opportunities within government or public service are vast. Nearly every job type found in the private sector exists in local, state and federal governments. Government also offers unique careers from representing US citizens abroad to developing policies that shape our nation’s schools to managing local emergencies.There are also unique jobs within the government sector, such as political office and intelligence and national security opportunities. 

Job Title Examples:

  • Auditor
  • City Manager
  • Cybersecurity Analyst
  • Economist
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Health Educator
  • Human Resources Assistant
  • Safety and Occupational Health Specialist
  • Program Analyst
  • Investigative Analyst
  • Language Specialist
  • Contract Specialist
  • Financial Analyst

Skills Needed:

  • Problem solving skills
  • Leadership skills
  • Research skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Organization
  • Communication and writing skills

Find Opportunities

Irishcompass 01

Using IrishCompass, LinkedIn, and ND’s alumni association directory called myND is the best way to start on the networking front.

Job Databases:

Because not all federal agencies are not required to post their opportunities in one central place, use USAJobs.gov as well as specific agency and department websites to find opportunities. Nearly all paid federal government opportunities are required to be posted on USAJobs.gov.

Federal

Federal - Internationally oriented

Capitol Hill

State

Municipal

Intelligence and National Security

Industry Timeline

Many government agencies do not recruit avidly on college campuses. Federal government hiring often takes 90-120 days. If you are interested in a government job or internship, apply early as these are often competitive opportunities. 

If applying for a STEM summer internship in a federal government agency, many of these are posted October through February. If applying for a pathways internship through USA jobs these are posted continuously throughout the year. If you are applying for an unpaid internship posted on a federal government agency’s website most of these are posted in the spring, however a few could be posted in the late fall; always check the agency’s website. 

For those agencies that require an extensive background security check, plan to apply during late summer, early fall and in some cases during Spring, a full year in advance, opportunities with the State Department, CIA, FBI, NSA, DOD, DHS, White House, some government consulting firms, and other agencies requiring the background security check. When not requiring a background security check, government agencies tend to post their internships anywhere from 2-5 months in advance of the actual position.

If you’re looking at state or municipal government opportunities the hiring timeline is often 2-5 months before the position’s start date.

Applying and Interviewing

Applications

Government organizations have strict processes in handling applications. Expect to take plenty of time to complete a government application. Follow the application instructions precisely and upload all required documents before hitting submit. 

Resumes

Your resume will often be the first impression for a potential employer.  You want to make sure that your resume is one page, concise, direct, and specific. Ensure that your resume is tailored for the position and for the industry. Highlighting relevant coursework, research projects/papers, senior capstone or thesis can also demonstrate research experience and methodology and topics you’ve studied relevant to the position. Review our guide on resumes for more information on how to construct professional documents.

If you are applying for a USAJobs.gov posting, create an account with USAJobs.gov, and build your federal resume through Documents > Upload or Build > select Build. 

Federal Resume
See tips and an example in our Career Development Guide.

Cover Letters

A cover letter introduces you to a potential employer. Use the position description to make specific connections between your skills and experience and what the organization is looking for in a candidate. The cover letter should be concise and well-written—if a potential employer reads your cover letter and is intrigued, they will then read your resume. Your cover letter should not repeat your resume verbatim, but enhance it. Together the cover letter and resume can help land you an interview. Review our guide on cover letters for more information on how to construct one.

Interviewing

Preparation is extremely important for interviews. Research the company/organization, current and previous projects they’ve worked on, and even the people that you’re interviewing with. This will not only help provide talking points but will show your knowledge and genuine interest in the position. If an interview is requested, expect a background and reference check. Utilize our resources on how to best prepare yourself to excel in your interview.

Online Resources

Federal

Municipal

Capitol Hill

Intelligence and National Security

 

Campus Resources

Anita

Career Counselor:
Anita Rees
Assistant Director, PreLaw, Government, Public Policy, Non-profits


Student Clubs/Organizations:

Employer Examples:

Federal

  • Capitol Hill
  • Department of Justice
  • Department of Energy
  • The White House
  • Securities Exchange Commission

State

  • New Jersey Governor’s Office
  • New York State Division of Human Rights
  • Maryland Department of Budget and Management
  • Massachusetts Attorney General's Office
  • Texas Secretary of State

Municipal

  • City of Philadelphia Office of the Mayor
  • Los Angeles Department of Housing and Community Investment
  • Hoffman Estates Public Works
  • Miami-Dade County Community Action and Human Services
  • New York City Parks and Recreation

Join Handshake:

Personalize your feed, explore your curiosities, and get updates that matter to you. Handshake is a dynamic system that works to match students with the most relevant resources and opportunities offered by our office including:

  • Access to personalized job recommendations – This is based on major, career interests, and profile information such as skills and experiences. When students fill out their profile, they’ll be able to see jobs and internships that match their interests and skills.
  • Ability to schedule one–on-one counseling appointments  – Counseling appointments are able to be scheduled through Handshake and held virtually via Zoom. 
  • Ability to Interact with employers – Students can research contact information for local and national employers. Employers can also message students with opportunities and information.
  • Connect with students across the country -  Students can interact with their peers through messaging, get tips and advice, as well as network. 
  • Search for and apply to open positions -  On Handshake, students can see jobs and internships posted specifically for them as well as employers actively recruiting from Notre Dame.